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Archive for the ‘Portrait’ Category

Rainbow and Lace Photoshoot

May 25th, 2012 No comments

I’m fortunate to have worked with many amazingly talented people in Vancouver, including makeup artists, hair stylists, models, photographers, stylists and designers. It's a great pleasure to have the opportunity to collaborate and create beautiful images with such talented people!

Here are some photos from a recent photoshoot with model Lily and makeup artist Mika - both of whom are beautiful, talented and great to work with!

Rainbow and Lace

Lily and Lace

Lily and Lace

Rainbow Eye

Lily White

Sugar Skull Inspired Makeup

April 10th, 2012 No comments

This photoshoot was about phobias, fears and the subconscious mind, featuring the body painting artwork of Meghan Thomas (Megs War Paint) with model Claudia Rylie.

The body painting included UV fluorescent paint as well as non-UV paint. To capture both types, I used black lights mixed with strobes. To make the UV paint glow, I used six 40 watt fluorescent black light tubes, and a 400 watt UV cannon. I surrounded Claudia with the black light tubes, and positioned the UV cannon to the right of the camera, in front of the Claudia.

I also used strobes to light the fog and Claudia's face or highlight the body painting. The strobes were White Lightnings with grids and reflectors, triggered with CyberSyncs.

To see more photos from this shoot, check out this set on Flickr (Warning: some of the photos are marked as "moderate" on Flickr due to partial nudity). Here is a video slideshow from the shoot (Warning: partial nudity - not safe for work).

Spooky

Click to view video slideshow (Warning: partial nudity)

Soundtrack: Dreamland 2011 by Crock

I have worked with Meghan many times and love her creativity and artistic skill. Claudia was a great model to work with, especially under the challenging conditions of black light body painting. There was about 4 hours of body painting before the shoot, then a variety of unconventional lighting set-ups, many requiring her to to be very still due to the slow shutter speeds required for the UV photography. I love the moody look of the photos that worked well with theme of the mysteries of the mind!

 

 

 

 

 

 
This photoshoot was about phobias, fears and the subconscious mind, featuring the body painting artwork of Meghan Thomas (Megs War Paint) with model Claudia Rylie.

The body painting included UV fluorescent paint as well as non-UV paint. To capture both types, I used black lights mixed with strobes. To make the UV paint glow, I used six 40 watt fluorescent black light tubes, and a 400 watt UV cannon. I surrounded Claudia with the black light tubes, and positioned the UV cannon to the right of the camera, in front of the Claudia.

I also used strobes to light the fog and Claudia's face or highlight the body painting. The strobes were White Lightnings with grids and reflectors, triggered with CyberSyncs.

To see more photos from this shoot, check out this set on Flickr (Warning: some of the photos are marked as "moderate" on Flickr due to partial nudity). Here is a video slideshow from the shoot (Warning: partial nudity - not safe for work).

Spooky

Click to view video slideshow (Warning: partial nudity)

Soundtrack: Dreamland 2011 by Crock

I have worked with Meghan many times and love her creativity and artistic skill. Claudia was a great model to work with, especially under the challenging conditions of black light body painting. There was about 4 hours of body painting before the shoot, then a variety of unconventional lighting set-ups, many requiring her to to be very still due to the slow shutter speeds required for the UV photography. I love the moody look of the photos that worked well with theme of the mysteries of the mind!

 

 

 

 

 

 
Here are some photos from a recent shoot with Blanche MacDonald student makeup artist Hannah Journey. The beautiful makeup was inspired by the sugar skull imagery from the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos. Thanks also to Carole Méthot, tadalafil who is also a makeup artist, for the awesome modeling work!

4 Cinemagraph Portraits

August 30th, 2011 No comments

Cinemagraphs are a combination of video and still photography, visit web thumb usually more of a photograph with some motion. The term cinemagraph was coined by Jamie Beck and Kevin Berg. Cinemagraphs are actually animated gifs, no rx which have been around for a long time, but they have a cinematic quality and retain the feel of a photograph.

A photographer friend of mine, Jenny Chen, was visting Vancouver so we decided to collaborate on a photoshoot and use the opportunity to try to create some cinemagraphs. It was the first time either of us had tried this. I followed an excellent video tutorial, which demonstrates how to create cinemagraphs using Photoshop CS5 Extended.

Here are 4 cinemagraphs from that shoot:

Credits:

Models: Taryn Emelia and Marina F Mendes

Makeup: Megs War Paint

Have you tried creating a cinemagraph? Feel free to post a link in the comment section!

Oksana and Scarlett – Glitter Makeup Photoshoot

August 3rd, 2011 No comments

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Here are some photos featuring glitter eye makeup by makeup artist Tessa Mitz, and models Oksana Bach and ScarlettS. We started the shoot in the studio using a couple different hand painted muslin backgrounds. One was a European-looking village scene and the other was a moonlit beach. I wasn't sure if these would look too cheesy, but I think they worked and gave a different look than a seamless paper background.  I'm always interested in different ideas for studio backgrounds!

After the studio session, we moved to a small Vancouver park to finish the shoot. A lot of my photography is done in the studio, so it was great to have the opportunity to do an outdoor location shoot with natural light.

Here's a slideshow with Scarlett's photos:

The music for both the videos is by Remote Spaces from the "Silo" album.

 

Glam Punk Photoshoot with Rachel Rampage

July 19th, 2011 1 comment

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Credits
Makeup: Tessa Mitz
Model: Rachel Rampage
Soundtrack: The Final Rewind by Tryad

I usually work in the studio with strobes and controlled lighting, so I wanted to try something different and used only natural light and a reflector for this shoot.  I loved just having the camera and the model to work with, and not worrying about the strobes, stands and umbrellas. Tessa helped out with the reflector to fill in shadows and brighten up the model in shaded areas.  Without all the lighting gear, we could move around quickly to wherever the light was good and the background was interesting.

The shoot was during the evening “golden hour” before sunset. The light was beautiful and worked perfectly. We had to move quickly though because the light changed rapidly as the sun was setting, and it also started to get cool and windy.

The location was an older industrial park near Main and Terminal in Vancouver. I love the decayed and worn textures of the buildings - lots of faded, peeling paint and rusty metal. We also went to a more modern area with glass and bold colours to work with.

I used Lightroom 3.4.1 and Photoshop CS5 for the post-processing, trying out several different styles and colour schemes. I'm looking for some feedback - which ones do you like/don't like and why? Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primavera de Muertos

March 28th, 2011 No comments

A photographer friend, who knows that I like to play around with old cameras, lent me her Minolta Maxxum 7xi (also known as the Dynax 7xi) to try out. Released in 1991, it was an advanced 35mm SLR camera for its time, with many innovative features. One of the coolest things about this camera are the expansion cards that it has for different creative program modes. They are intended to make the camera easy to use - just load the card and set the camera to P (program). I guess in 1991 it was not feasible to build all of the programs into the camera like modern cameras.

I tried out the camera during a studio shoot using manual exposure, without the expansion cards.  I attached a CyberSync to the hotshoe using a Minolta/Sony hotshoe adapter because the Minolta uses a proprietary hotshoe system (same as the Sony Alpha system). I set the shutter speed to 1/60th sec because I wasn't sure about the camera's sync speed. I looked it up later and found it is 1/200th sec, which is pretty good.  I loaded the camera with Kodak Ektar ISO 100 colour negative film.

Strengths - excellent TTL metering system

Fast and accurate autofocus

Large bright viewfinder

Mid-roll film exchange

Manual film speed override

Weaknesses

Although the body is heavy and rugged, it is not weatherproof

The battery is expensive and not rechargeable (I paid $14.99 for a new 2CR5 lithium battery). It is supposed to be good for 50 rolls of 24 exposure film, without the use of the flash

Heavy, especially for traveling or hiking.

Program

 

Automatic rewind

Built-in motordrive

Lenses - Minolta A-Type bayonet mount - accepts all Minolta AF lenses

Related Links

Detailed specification of the Minolta Maxxum 7xi
A photographer friend, who knows that I like to play around with old cameras, lent me her Minolta Maxxum 7xi (also known as the Dynax 7xi) to try out. Released in 1991, it was an advanced 35mm SLR camera for its time, with many innovative features. One of the coolest things about this camera are the expansion cards that it has for different creative program modes. They are intended to make the camera easy to use - just load the card and set the camera to P (program). I guess in 1991 it was not feasible to build all of the programs into the camera like modern cameras.

I tried out the camera during a studio shoot using manual exposure, without the expansion cards.  I attached a CyberSync to the hotshoe using a Minolta/Sony hotshoe adapter because the Minolta uses a proprietary hotshoe system (same as the Sony Alpha system). I set the shutter speed to 1/60th sec because I wasn't sure about the camera's sync speed. I looked it up later and found it is 1/200th sec, which is pretty good.  I loaded the camera with Kodak Ektar ISO 100 colour negative film.

Strengths - excellent TTL metering system

Fast and accurate autofocus

Large bright viewfinder

Mid-roll film exchange

Manual film speed override

Weaknesses

Although the body is heavy and rugged, it is not weatherproof

The battery is expensive and not rechargeable (I paid $14.99 for a new 2CR5 lithium battery). It is supposed to be good for 50 rolls of 24 exposure film, without the use of the flash

Heavy, especially for traveling or hiking.

Program

 

Automatic rewind

Built-in motordrive

Lenses - Minolta A-Type bayonet mount - accepts all Minolta AF lenses

Related Links

Detailed specification of the Minolta Maxxum 7xi

Credits

Model: Tia Guzzo
Makeup: Jennifer Ruth
Hair: Hair Styling: Rhi Yee
Fashion stylist: Jihan Amer
Set decorator: Guen Gianfranchi
Photography: Lloyd K. Barnes
Music: Nanten

This shoot was based on the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), treatment but with a Spring blossom twist. The makeup was inspired by calaveras de azúcar (sugar skulls) that are given as offerings to the dead on November 1, and by the work of 666 Photography and the art of Sylvia Ji.

The Day of the Dead festival originated with the ancient Aztecs and was dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl, the queen of Mictlan, the Aztec underworld who keeps watch over the bones of the dead. Her husband is Mictlantecuhtli, was the Aztec god of the dead, Lord of Mictlan. The celebration continues today in Mexico and parts of the United States.

Mictlantecuhtli - Aztec God of the Dead

Mictlantecuhtli - Aztec God of the Dead

This is the second Dia de los Muertos shoot in a series. The first was In the Darkenss of Winter and the next two are in planning stages.

Do you have some favourite Day of the Dead images or makeup? Share the links in the comments section below!

 

 


Five Portrait and Fashion Photography Masters of the 20th Century

December 3rd, 2010 No comments

I recently took a photographic art history course that covered photography from the beginning to 1979. Here are five of my favourite 20th century portrait and fashion photographers. I love surrealism, quirky subjects, striking graphic design, and amazing technical skill. I have picked these photographers because they have created iconic images that continue to delight viewers and inspire us all!

Man Ray  (1890-1976)

Man Ray was an American avant-garde photographer who worked in Paris during the 1920s and 30s. He experimented with techniques such as solarization and photograms and was influenced by, and part of, the surrealist art movement. His work in turn has influenced future generations of photographers.

Le Violin d'Ingres - Man Ray (1924)

Tears - Man Ray (1930-32)

Martin Munkácsi (1896 - 1963)

Martin Munkácsi was one of the first photographers to use movement and action in fashion photography. He photographed many different subjects including photojournalism and sports, and excelled in getting a sense of motion on his photographs. His motto was "Think While You Shoot"!

Lucile Brokaw on the Long Island Beach - Martin Mukasci (1933)

Peignoir in a soft breeze - Martin Munkácsi (1936)

Gallery of Martin Munkácsi images.

Philippe Halsman (1906 - 1979)

Philippe Halsman was a celebrity portrait and fashion photographer. He photographed Marilyn Monroe, Albert Einstein, John F. Kennedy and many others. His also worked with Salvador Dali and produced the book "Dali's Moustache" in 1954. His technical skill and creative work are amazing!

Philippe Halsman Photos

Vintage Philippe Halsman

Irving Penn (1917 - 2009)

Irving Penn photographed for Vogue magazine in the 1940s and continued doing fashion, portrait and still life for over six decades. His work is visually stunning with a great eye for detail and composition.

Vogue Cover - Irving Penn (1950)

Vogue Cover - Irving Penn (1950)

Irving Penn, A Career in Photography

NY Times slide show

Richard Avedon (1923 - 2004)

Richard Avedon photographed for Harper's Bazaar, Vogue and many other magazines, and his portraits were often shot against a plain background with full attention on the subject. His ability to capture mood and emotion through expression and movement was one of his many photographic talents.

Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d'Hiver, Paris, France - Richard Avedon (1955)

Natassja Kinski - Richard Avedon (1988)

Fraenkel Gallery

Richard Avedon in the Sixties

There are many more amazing fashion and portrait photographers who I have not mentioned in this post. Who are your favourites? Write a comment!


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