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Posts Tagged ‘special effects’

Street Fight in Blood Alley

November 26th, 2012 No comments

Blood Alley was an appropriately named location for this street fighter photoshoot as there was certainly a lot of  blood involved! Tessa did an amazing job with the cuts and bruises and liberal application of theatrical blood.

Location shoots are a good change from the studio, purchase and I like to do them when the weather cooperates. There are always challenges – in this case the sun was very bright, so we found shaded areas and I used reflectors and speedlites for lighting. Also, even though we were shooting on a Sunday, there was a lot of traffic (both vehicles and pedestrians) that slowed us down while we waited for the location to clear before continuing.

Thanks also to Douglas and Sean for their fighting choreography skills and Catherine for assisting me during the shoot.

Credits:

Makeup: Tessa Mitz

Photography Assistant: Catherine Millard

Fighters: Douglas McDowell and Sean Mathews

Location: Blood Alley, Gastown, Vancouver

Zombies!

October 21st, 2012 10 comments

Here are some photos from a recent collaboration with makeup artist Tessa Mitz. Tessa is a versatile makeup artist who I have worked with on many occasions. As you can see from these photos, cost she does amazing special effects work. With Halloween coming up and the new season of The Walking Dead starting this month, dosage I thought that Zombies would be an appropriate theme!

The photos were shot on location in Vancouver. It was a lot of fun and we had a few curious onlookers during the shoot!

Credits:

Zombies: Helen of Joy, dosage Christina Martine

Victims: Dustin St Christopher, Sobie La

Hair stylists: Kyra Harley, Karly Connell

Makeup Artist: Tessa Mitz

© 2012 Lloyd K Barnes

 

5 Tips for using a fog machine for studio photography

September 26th, 2010 4 comments
The Trouble with Ducts

Fog machine with side lighting. Model: Katilin V, Makeup by Catriona Armour

Fog adds a cool look and atmosphere to a studio shoot. I bought a fog machine at a local party supply store and got an extra bottle of “fog juice”. One bottle lasts for a long time so I have plenty of it left, even after using it for about a dozen shoots. This fog machine has a handy remote control that lets me fire a blast of fog when I’m ready to shoot. They are pretty popular for Halloween so you may see them for sale for a good price at this time of year.

The type of machine I use is a “glycol fogger” and it works by heating up a fluid called “fog juice” and then shooting the fog out of a nozzle.  Since I am a chemist as well as a photographer, I needed to know what fog juice actually is. It is mainly glycerin, propylene glycol and water and is non-toxic (note – a similar sounding chemical – ethylene glycol – is toxic and should not be used for fog machines!). However, there is always the possibility that certain people could be sensitive to the glycerin and propylene glycol so it’s a good idea to make sure everyone is OK with it when the fog starts.

There are other ways to generate fog. For example, dry ice and water works, but it’s expensive and difficult to use. Dry ice must be handled carefully because it is extremely cold and will burn bare skin. Because dry ice produces carbon dioxide gas when it warms up, it should be used in well-ventilated areas, and never in small enclosed spaces due to the risk of suffocation.  The fog is colder than the surrounding air and will sink to the ground, which might be an interesting effect. The fog from the glycol fogger doesn’t sink – it tends to float at the level where it was generated.

Here are some tips based on my experience with using the fog machine.

A Force to Reckon With

Fog machine with back lighting. Model: BabieAngie, Makeup: Krystal Leong

Lighting

The fog needs lighting to make it visible. Back lighting with the strobe out-of-frame or hidden behind the model looks great. Also, side lighting works well as shown in the shot of Kaitlin V. I use a hard light – usually a strobe with a tight grid or snoot to give a beam of light through the fog. Use the same precautions that you would normally use when potentially shooting into the light – use flags to shield the lens and avoid lens flare. Sometimes a bit of flare looks cool with the fog so you may want to experiment!

Fashion Doll

Fog machine using a black background and strobes with blue gels. Model: Charity, Makeup: Jennifer Ruth, Fashion Stylist: Celina Prado

Use a dark background

The fog is white and does not show up against light backgrounds. Use a dark background such as black seamless paper or black fabric for the most dramatic look. I learned that the hard way when I tried shooting against a white background and the fog was hardly visible!

Use gels

You can change the colour of the fog by putting a gel on the strobe that’s lighting the fog. You can also light the fog with two strobes, using gels with harmonizing colours to create a dramatic look.

Tribal Belly Dancer

Fog machine and strobe with red gel. Model: Stephanie Peregrinus, Makeup and hair stylist: Catriona Amour

Have an assistant

It helps a lot to have an assistant (for me it’s usually the makeup artist!) to direct the fog by pointing the machine in the right place – usually in front of the lights or behind the model. I use a light weight fog machine so it is not too difficult to hold for a while. Some of the more industrial grade machines are heavier so you need a strong “fog wrangler” for the job! Make sure the assistant knows that the nozzle of the fog machine can get quite hot! I get my assistant to move the fog machine in the right place, then let her know when I’m going to blast some fog with the remote control.

Use sparingly

The best looking fog is usually very soon after it comes out of the machine. This is when you get lots of swirling, smoky fog. It quickly diffuses and after a while it dissipates through the studio, creating a haze that doesn’t look so great. When there’s too much fog between the camera and the model, it just reduces the contrast. If I’m doing several sets, I usually wait until the end for the fog, or open up the studio after a while and blow it out with an electric fan!

Have fun

Don’t forget to have fun and experiment with it! If you have some tips for using fog in photography, please share them in the comment section.

Credits

Catriona Armour

Krystal Leong

Jennifer Ruth

Charity

BabieAngie

Stephanie Peregrinus

Kaitlin V

Celina Prado

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