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Zombies!

October 21st, 2012 10 comments

This photoshoot was about phobias, fears and the subconscious mind, featuring the body painting artwork of Meghan Thomas (Megs War Paint) with model Claudia Rylie.

The body painting included UV fluorescent paint as well as non-UV paint. To capture both types, I used black lights mixed with strobes. To make the UV paint glow, I used six 40 watt fluorescent black light tubes, and a 400 watt UV cannon. I surrounded Claudia with the black light tubes, and positioned the UV cannon to the right of the camera, in front of the Claudia.

I also used strobes to light the fog and Claudia's face or highlight the body painting. The strobes were White Lightnings with grids and reflectors, triggered with CyberSyncs.

To see more photos from this shoot, check out this set on Flickr (Warning: some of the photos are marked as "moderate" on Flickr due to partial nudity and you must be signed into Flickr to see them).

Meghan Thomas:  I have worked with Meghan many times and love her creativity and artistic skill. She always comes prepared to the shoot with lots of ideas, designs and plans for the body painting, as well as being an easy going and fun person to work with.

Claudia Riley: Claudia is a skilled model and she is also a dancer with excellent body awareness and control. It is especially challenging for black light body painting photography. First she was required to sit through about 4 hours of body painting, then pose during variety of unconventional lighting set-ups, many requiring her to to be very still due to the slow shutter speeds. She was great to work with, patient and collaborated to get some amazing shots!

This photoshoot was about phobias, fears and the subconscious mind, featuring the body painting artwork of Meghan Thomas (Megs War Paint) with model Claudia Rylie.

The body painting included UV fluorescent paint as well as non-UV paint. To capture both types, I used black lights mixed with strobes. To make the UV paint glow, I used six 40 watt fluorescent black light tubes, and a 400 watt UV cannon. I surrounded Claudia with the black light tubes, and positioned the UV cannon to the right of the camera, in front of the Claudia.

I also used strobes to light the fog and Claudia's face or highlight the body painting. The strobes were White Lightnings with grids and reflectors, triggered with CyberSyncs.

To see more photos from this shoot, check out this set on Flickr (Warning: some of the photos are marked as "moderate" on Flickr due to partial nudity and you must be signed into Flickr to see them).

Meghan Thomas:  I have worked with Meghan many times and love her creativity and artistic skill. She always comes prepared to the shoot with lots of ideas, designs and plans for the body painting, as well as being an easy going and fun person to work with.

Claudia Riley: Claudia is a skilled model and she is also a dancer with excellent body awareness and control. It is especially challenging for black light body painting photography. First she was required to sit through about 4 hours of body painting, then pose during variety of unconventional lighting set-ups, many requiring her to to be very still due to the slow shutter speeds. She was great to work with, patient and collaborated to get some amazing shots!

Here are some photos from a recent collaboration with makeup artist Tessa Mitz. Tessa is a versatile makeup artist who I have worked with on many occasions. As you can see from these photos, she does amazing special effects work. With Halloween coming up and the new season of The Walking Dead starting this month, dosage I thought that Zombies would be an appropriate theme!

The photos were shot on location in Vancouver. It was a lot of fun and we had a few curious onlookers during the shoot!

Credits:

Zombies: Helen of Joy, dosage Christina Martine

Victims: Dustin St Christopher, Sobie La

Hair stylists: Kyra Harley, Karly Connell

Makeup Artist: Tessa Mitz

© 2012 Lloyd K Barnes

 

Photographing the 2011 Vancouver Zombiewalk

August 21st, 2011 No comments

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Each year the Vancouver Zombie Walk gets bigger and more popular. According to the Facebook event page, there were over 6,000 confirmed attendees. I don't know how many zombies actually showed up, but I suspect more than that!

Many of the zombies also had cameras and smartphones, but with all the amazing costumes and special effect makeup, the event also attracted a lot of photographers and videographers. I was very interested in the gear that they were using! I saw a few people with HD-DSLR rigs and several with off-camera flash set-ups. Others had speedlites with various attachments to help diffuse the light. The flash set-ups were a good way to reduce the contrast by filling in the shadows. I saw one photographer with a vintage twin lens reflex camera (a Rolleiflex I think). There was some very impressive gear!

For those who may be interested, here's some information about the photos that I took:

I used an Olympus E-30 with the Olympus 12-60 mm lens for wide angle and the 50-200 mm for zoom.

It was a bright sunny day, so I tried to find shady areas and expose for the shade. I also used backlighting and exposed for the shadow side of the zombies using centre-weighted mode. I had the in-body image stabilization and face detection on. I haven't used face detection very often. I found that it sometimes focused on the wrong place, so I probably will avoid it in the future.  I set the camera to continuous (burst) shooting mode and continuous autofocus. That way I could fire off a bunch of action shots when a zombie started running towards me!

For lighting, I wanted to keep it simple so went with available light only. I used ISO 200 and a wide aperture (around f/2.8 to f/3.5) and a fast shutter speed to minimize the motion blur but also isolate the zombies from the background due to the shallow depth of field. I used the fastest shutter speeds that I could to minimize any blur caused by camera shake.

Here's my gallery of Vancouver Zombie walk photos on Facebook. If you were at the zombie walk, you might be in the gallery - so feel free to tag yourself and your friends!

Also, feel free to share any links to your zombie walk photos as well as any tips about how you photographed the event. I'm looking forward to Zombiewalk 2012!

Free Lightroom “Zombie Circus” Preset

August 23rd, 2010 4 comments

Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera (1979) The Pentax ME Super featured aperture priority automatic mode and TTL light meter. It also has a fully manual mode and syncs at 1/125 s.  It was a manual focus camera and used the Pentax K mount lenses. The camera shown above is equipped with the Pentax 50mm f/1.7 lens. It was a very popular camera with advanced amateur photographers.

Links:

Wikipedia entry for Pentax ME Super

A look inside the camera

Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera (1979)

Pentax ME Super 35mm Camera


Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera (1979) The Pentax ME Super featured aperture priority automatic mode and TTL light meter. It also has a fully manual mode and syncs at 1/125 s.  It was a manual focus camera and used the Pentax K mount lenses. The camera shown above is equipped with the Pentax 50mm f/1.7 lens. It was a very popular camera with advanced amateur photographers.

Links:

Wikipedia entry for Pentax ME Super

A look inside the camera

Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera (1979)

Pentax ME Super 35mm Camera


Zombie ApocalypseI was at the Vancouver Zombiewalk on Saturday August 21, approved and was amazed at the incredible costumes, makeup and huge number of zombies! Of course, sildenafil with such great subjects to shoot, there were a lot of photographers too! It was a lot of fun – like Halloween but in the summer.

Click here to see more photos from the walk. I used Lightroom 3 for post-processing and decided to go with a gritty retro look. If you want to try it out, feel free to download the preset.

Click here to go to the download page.

You can find instructions for installing presets at the Digital Photography School.

Leave a comment if you like this preset!

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